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Hip

THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SURGEON TRAINING GRADE AND RISK OF REVISION FOLLOWING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY: ANALYSIS FROM THE NATIONAL JOINT REGISTRY OF ENGLAND, WALES, NORTHERN IRELAND, AND THE ISLE OF MAN

British Hip Society (BHS) meeting, held online, 9–11 June 2021.



Abstract

Total hip replacements (THRs) are performed by surgeons at various stages in their training, with varying levels of senior supervision. There is a balance between protecting training opportunities for the next generation of surgeons, while limiting the exposure of patients to unnecessary risk during the training process. The aim of this study was to examine the association between surgeon grade, the senior supervision of trainees, and the risk of revision following THR.

We included 603 474 primary THRs recorded in the National Joint Registry for England, Wales, Northern Ireland, and the Isle of Man (NJR) between 2003 and 2016 for an indication of osteoarthritis. Exposures were the grade of the surgeon (consultant or trainee), and whether trainees were supervised by a scrubbed consultant or not. Outcomes were all-cause revision, the indication for revision, and the temporal variation in risk of revision (all up to 10 years). Net failure was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and adjusted analyses used Cox regression and flexible parametric survival analysis (adjusted for patient, operative, and unit level factors).

There was no association between surgeon grade and all-cause revision up to 10 years (crude hazard ratio (HR) 0·999, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.936–1.065; p=0.966); a finding which persisted with adjusted analysis. Adjusted analysis demonstrated an association between trainees operating without supervision by a scrubbed consultant and an increase in all-cause revision (HR 1.100, 95% CI 1.002–1.207; p=0.045). There was an association between the trainee-performed THRs and revision due to instability (crude HR 1.143, 95% CI, 1.007–1.298; p=0.039). However, this was not observed in fully adjusted models, or when trainees were supervised by a scrubbed consultant.

Within the current training system in the United Kingdom, trainees achieve comparable outcomes to consultant surgeons when supervised by a scrubbed consultant. Revision rates are higher when trainees are not supervised by a scrubbed consultant but remain within internationally recognised acceptable limits.


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