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Bone & Joint Open
Vol. 5, Issue 6 | Pages 479 - 488
6 Jun 2024
Paksoy A Meller S Schwotzer F Moroder P Trampuz A Imiolczyk J Perka C Hackl M Plachel F Akgün D

Aims

Current diagnostic tools are not always able to effectively identify periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs). Recent studies suggest that circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) undergo changes under pathological conditions such as infection. The aim of this study was to analyze miRNA expression in hip arthroplasty PJI patients.

Methods

This was a prospective pilot study, including 24 patients divided into three groups, with eight patients each undergoing revision of their hip arthroplasty due to aseptic reasons, and low- and high-grade PJI, respectively. The number of intraoperative samples and the incidence of positive cultures were recorded for each patient. Additionally, venous blood samples and periarticular tissue samples were collected from each patient to determine miRNA expressions between the groups. MiRNA screening was performed by small RNA-sequencing using the miRNA next generation sequencing (NGS) discovery (miND) pipeline.


Bone & Joint Research
Vol. 13, Issue 6 | Pages 272 - 278
5 Jun 2024
Niki Y Huber G Behzadi K Morlock MM

Aims

Periprosthetic fracture and implant loosening are two of the major reasons for revision surgery of cementless implants. Optimal implant fixation with minimal bone damage is challenging in this procedure. This pilot study investigates whether vibratory implant insertion is gentler compared to consecutive single blows for acetabular component implantation in a surrogate polyurethane (PU) model.

Methods

Acetabular components (cups) were implanted into 1 mm nominal under-sized cavities in PU foams (15 and 30 per cubic foot (PCF)) using a vibratory implant insertion device and an automated impaction device for single blows. The impaction force, remaining polar gap, and lever-out moment were measured and compared between the impaction methods.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 106-B, Issue 6 | Pages 565 - 572
1 Jun 2024
Resl M Becker L Steinbrück A Wu Y Perka C

Aims

This study compares the re-revision rate and mortality following septic and aseptic revision hip arthroplasty (rTHA) in registry data, and compares the outcomes to previously reported data.

Methods

This is an observational cohort study using data from the German Arthroplasty Registry (EPRD). A total of 17,842 rTHAs were included, and the rates and cumulative incidence of hip re-revision and mortality following septic and aseptic rTHA were analyzed with seven-year follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to determine the re-revision rate and cumulative probability of mortality following rTHA.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 106-B, Issue 6 | Pages 548 - 554
1 Jun 2024
Ohyama Y Minoda Y Masuda S Sugama R Ohta Y Nakamura H

Aims

The aim of this study was to compare the pattern of initial fixation and changes in periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD) between patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) using a traditional fully hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated stem (T-HA group) and those with a newly introduced fully HA-coated stem (N-HA group).

Methods

The study included 36 patients with T-HA stems and 30 with N-HA stems. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure the change in periprosthetic BMD, one and two years postoperatively. The 3D contact between the stem and femoral cortical bone was evaluated using a density-mapping system, and clinical assessment, including patient-reported outcome measurements, was recorded.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 106-B, Issue 6 | Pages 540 - 547
1 Jun 2024
Nandra RS Elnahal WA Mayne A Brash L McBryde CW Treacy RBC

Aims

The Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) was introduced in 1997 to address the needs of young active patients using a historically proven large-diameter metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing. A single designer surgeon’s consecutive series of 130 patients (144 hips) was previously reported at five and ten years, reporting three and ten failures, respectively. The aim of this study was to extend the follow-up of this original cohort at 25 years.

Methods

The study extends the reporting on the first consecutive 144 resurfacing procedures in 130 patients for all indications. All operations were undertaken between August 1997 and May 1998. The mean age at operation was 52.1 years (SD 9.93; 17 to 76), and included 37 female patients (28.5%). Failure was defined as revision of either component for any reason. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. Routine follow-up with serum metal ion levels, radiographs, and Oxford Hip Scores (OHSs) was undertaken.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 106-B, Issue 6 | Pages 555 - 564
1 Jun 2024
Leal J Holland CT Cochrane NH Seyler TM Jiranek WA Wellman SS Bolognesi MP Ryan SP

Aims

This study aims to assess the relationship between history of pseudotumour formation secondary to metal-on-metal (MoM) implants and periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) rate, as well as establish ESR and CRP thresholds that are suggestive of infection in these patients. We hypothesized that patients with a pseudotumour were at increased risk of infection.

Methods

A total of 1,171 total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients with MoM articulations from August 2000 to March 2014 were retrospectively identified. Of those, 328 patients underwent metal artefact reduction sequence MRI and had minimum two years’ clinical follow-up, and met our inclusion criteria. Data collected included demographic details, surgical indication, laterality, implants used, history of pseudotumour, and their corresponding preoperative ESR (mm/hr) and CRP (mg/dl) levels. Multivariate logistic regression modelling was used to evaluate PJI and history of pseudotumour, and receiver operating characteristic curves were created to assess the diagnostic capabilities of ESR and CRP to determine the presence of infection in patients undergoing revision surgery.


Bone & Joint Open
Vol. 5, Issue 5 | Pages 394 - 400
15 May 2024
Nishi M Atsumi T Yoshikawa Y Okano I Nakanishi R Watanabe M Usui Y Kudo Y

Aims

The localization of necrotic areas has been reported to impact the prognosis and treatment strategy for osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Anteroposterior localization of the necrotic area after a femoral neck fracture (FNF) has not been properly investigated. We hypothesize that the change of the weight loading direction on the femoral head due to residual posterior tilt caused by malunited FNF may affect the location of ONFH. We investigate the relationship between the posterior tilt angle (PTA) and anteroposterior localization of osteonecrosis using lateral hip radiographs.

Methods

Patients aged younger than 55 years diagnosed with ONFH after FNF were retrospectively reviewed. Overall, 65 hips (38 males and 27 females; mean age 32.6 years (SD 12.2)) met the inclusion criteria. Patients with stage 1 or 4 ONFH, as per the Association Research Circulation Osseous classification, were excluded. The ratios of anterior and posterior viable areas and necrotic areas of the femoral head to the articular surface were calculated by setting the femoral head centre as the reference point. The PTA was measured using Palm’s method. The association between the PTA and viable or necrotic areas of the femoral head was assessed using Spearman’s rank correlation analysis (median PTA 6.0° (interquartile range 3 to 11.5)).


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 106-B, Issue 5 | Pages 442 - 449
1 May 2024
Nieboer MF van der Jagt OP de Munter L de Jongh MAC van de Ree CLP

Aims

Periprosthetic proximal femoral fractures (PFFs) are a major complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Health status after PFF is not specifically investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the health status pattern over two years after sustaining a PFF.

Methods

A cohort of patients with PFF after THA was derived from the Brabant Injury Outcomes Surveillance (BIOS) study. The BIOS study, a prospective, observational, multicentre follow-up cohort study, was conducted to obtain data by questionnaires pre-injury and at one week, and one, three, six, 12, and 24 months after trauma. Primary outcome measures were the EuroQol five-dimension three-level questionnaire (EQ-5D-3L), the Health Utility Index 2 (HUI2), and the Health Utility Index 3 (HUI3). Secondary outcome measures were general measurements such as duration of hospital stay and mortality.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 106-B, Issue 5 | Pages 435 - 441
1 May 2024
Angelomenos V Mohaddes M Kärrholm J Malchau H Shareghi B Itayem R

Aims

Refobacin Bone Cement R and Palacos R + G bone cement were introduced to replace the original cement Refobacin Palacos R in 2005. Both cements were assumed to behave in a biomechanically similar fashion to the original cement. The primary aim of this study was to compare the migration of a polished triple-tapered femoral stem fixed with either Refobacin Bone Cement R or Palacos R + G bone cement. Repeated radiostereometric analysis was used to measure migration of the femoral head centre. The secondary aims were evaluation of cement mantle, stem positioning, and patient-reported outcome measures.

Methods

Overall, 75 patients were included in the study and 71 were available at two years postoperatively. Prior to surgery, they were randomized to one of the three combinations studied: Palacos cement with use of the Optivac mixing system, Refobacin with use of the Optivac system, and Refobacin with use of the Optipac system. Cemented MS30 stems and cemented Exceed acetabular components were used in all hips. Postoperative radiographs were used to assess the quality of the cement mantle according to Barrack et al, and the position and migration of the femoral stem. Harris Hip Score, Oxford Hip Score, Forgotten Joint Score, and University of California, Los Angeles Activity Scale were collected.


Bone & Joint Research
Vol. 13, Issue 4 | Pages 193 - 200
23 Apr 2024
Reynolds A Doyle R Boughton O Cobb J Muirhead-Allwood S Jeffers J

Aims

Manual impaction, with a mallet and introducer, remains the standard method of installing cementless acetabular cups during total hip arthroplasty (THA). This study aims to quantify the accuracy and precision of manual impaction strikes during the seating of an acetabular component. This understanding aims to help improve impaction surgical techniques and inform the development of future technologies.

Methods

Posterior approach THAs were carried out on three cadavers by an expert orthopaedic surgeon. An instrumented mallet and introducer were used to insert cementless acetabular cups. The motion of the mallet, relative to the introducer, was analyzed for a total of 110 strikes split into low-, medium-, and high-effort strikes. Three parameters were extracted from these data: strike vector, strike offset, and mallet face alignment.


Bone & Joint Research
Vol. 13, Issue 4 | Pages 184 - 192
18 Apr 2024
Morita A Iida Y Inaba Y Tezuka T Kobayashi N Choe H Ike H Kawakami E

Aims

This study was designed to develop a model for predicting bone mineral density (BMD) loss of the femur after total hip arthroplasty (THA) using artificial intelligence (AI), and to identify factors that influence the prediction. Additionally, we virtually examined the efficacy of administration of bisphosphonate for cases with severe BMD loss based on the predictive model.

Methods

The study included 538 joints that underwent primary THA. The patients were divided into groups using unsupervised time series clustering for five-year BMD loss of Gruen zone 7 postoperatively, and a machine-learning model to predict the BMD loss was developed. Additionally, the predictor for BMD loss was extracted using SHapley Additive exPlanations (SHAP). The patient-specific efficacy of bisphosphonate, which is the most important categorical predictor for BMD loss, was examined by calculating the change in predictive probability when hypothetically switching between the inclusion and exclusion of bisphosphonate.


Bone & Joint Open
Vol. 5, Issue 4 | Pages 304 - 311
15 Apr 2024
Galloway R Monnington K Moss R Donaldson J Skinner J McCulloch R

Aims

Young adults undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) largely have different indications for surgery, preoperative function, and postoperative goals compared to a standard patient group. The aim of our study was to describe young adult THA preoperative function and quality of life, and to assess postoperative satisfaction and compare this with functional outcome measures.

Methods

A retrospective cohort analysis of young adults (aged < 50 years) undergoing THA between May 2018 and May 2023 in a single tertiary centre was undertaken. Median follow-up was 31 months (12 to 61). Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and focus group-designed questionnaires were distributed. Searches identified 244 cases in 225 patients. Those aged aged under 30 years represented 22.7% of the cohort. Developmental dysplasia of the hip (50; 45.5%) and Perthes’ disease (15; 13.6%) were the commonest indications for THA.


Bone & Joint Open
Vol. 5, Issue 4 | Pages 286 - 293
9 Apr 2024
Upadhyay PK Kumar V Mirza SB Shah N

Aims

This study reports the results of 38 total hip arthroplasties (THAs) in 33 patients aged less than 50 years, using the JRI Furlong hydroxyapatite ceramic (HAC)-coated femoral component.

Methods

We describe the survival, radiological, and functional outcomes of 33 patients (38 THAs) at a mean follow-up of 27 years (25 to 32) between 1988 and 2018.


Aims

The aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence of reoperation (all cause and specifically for periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF)) and mortality, and associated risk factors, following a hemiarthroplasty incorporating a cemented collarless polished taper slip stem (PTS) for management of an intracapsular hip fracture.

Methods

This retrospective study included hip fracture patients aged 50 years and older treated with Exeter (PTS) bipolar hemiarthroplasty between 2019 and 2022. Patient demographics, place of domicile, fracture type, delirium status, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, length of stay, and mortality were collected. Reoperation and mortality were recorded up to a median follow-up of 29.5 months (interquartile range 12 to 51.4). Cox regression was performed to evaluate independent risk factors associated with reoperation and mortality.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 106-B, Issue 4 | Pages 359 - 364
1 Apr 2024
Özdemir E de Lange B Buckens CFM Rijnen WHC Visser J

Aims

To investigate the extent of bone development around the scaffold of custom triflange acetabular components (CTACs) over time.

Methods

We performed a single-centre historical prospective cohort study, including all patients with revision THA using the aMace CTAC between January 2017 and March 2021. A total of 18 patients (18 CTACs) were included. Models of the hemipelvis and the scaffold component of the CTACs were created by segmentation of CT scans. The CT scans were performed immediately postoperatively and at least one year after surgery. The amount of bone in contact with the scaffold was analyzed at both times, and the difference was calculated.


Aims

Revision total hip arthroplasty in patients with Vancouver type B3 fractures with Paprosky type IIIA, IIIB, and IV femoral defects are difficult to treat. One option for Paprovsky type IIIB and IV defects involves modular cementless, tapered, revision femoral components in conjunction with distal interlocking screws. The aim of this study was to analyze the rate of reoperations and complications and union of the fracture, subsidence of the stem, mortality, and the clinical outcomes in these patients.

Methods

A total of 46 femoral components in patients with Vancouver B3 fractures (23 with Paprosky type IIIA, 19 with type IIIB, and four with type IV defects) in 46 patients were revised with a transfemoral approach using a modular, tapered, cementless revision Revitan curved femoral component with distal cone-in-cone fixation and prospectively followed for a mean of 48.8 months (SD 23.9; 24 to 112). The mean age of the patients was 80.4 years (66 to 100). Additional distal interlocking was also used in 23 fractures in which distal cone-in-cone fixation in the isthmus was < 3 cm.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 106-B, Issue 4 | Pages 352 - 358
1 Apr 2024
Wilson JM Trousdale RT Bedard NA Lewallen DG Berry DJ Abdel MP

Aims

Dislocation remains a leading cause of failure following revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). While dual-mobility (DM) bearings have been shown to mitigate this risk, options are limited when retaining or implanting an uncemented shell without modular DM options. In these circumstances, a monoblock DM cup, designed for cementing, can be cemented into an uncemented acetabular shell. The goal of this study was to describe the implant survival, complications, and radiological outcomes of this construct.

Methods

We identified 64 patients (65 hips) who had a single-design cemented DM cup cemented into an uncemented acetabular shell during revision THA between 2018 and 2020 at our institution. Cups were cemented into either uncemented cups designed for liner cementing (n = 48; 74%) or retained (n = 17; 26%) acetabular components. Median outer head diameter was 42 mm. Mean age was 69 years (SD 11), mean BMI was 32 kg/m2 (SD 8), and 52% (n = 34) were female. Survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier methods. Mean follow-up was two years (SD 0.97).


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 106-B, Issue 4 | Pages 336 - 343
1 Apr 2024
Haertlé M Becker N Windhagen H Ahmad SS

Aims

Periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is widely recognized as a demanding surgical procedure for acetabular reorientation. Reports about the learning curve have primarily focused on complication rates during the initial learning phase. Therefore, our aim was to assess the PAO learning curve from an analytical perspective by determining the number of PAOs required for the duration of surgery to plateau and the accuracy to improve.

Methods

The study included 118 consecutive PAOs in 106 patients. Of these, 28 were male (23.7%) and 90 were female (76.3%). The primary endpoint was surgical time. Secondary outcome measures included radiological parameters. Cumulative summation analysis was used to determine changes in surgical duration. A multivariate linear regression model was used to identify independent factors influencing surgical time.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 106-B, Issue 4 | Pages 324 - 335
1 Apr 2024
Fontalis A Kayani B Plastow R Giebaly DE Tahmassebi J Haddad IC Chambers A Mancino F Konan S Haddad FS

Aims

Achieving accurate implant positioning and restoring native hip biomechanics are key surgeon-controlled technical objectives in total hip arthroplasty (THA). The primary objective of this study was to compare the reproducibility of the planned preoperative centre of hip rotation (COR) in patients undergoing robotic arm-assisted THA versus conventional THA.

Methods

This prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) included 60 patients with symptomatic hip osteoarthritis undergoing conventional THA (CO THA) versus robotic arm-assisted THA (RO THA). Patients in both arms underwent pre- and postoperative CT scans, and a patient-specific plan was created using the robotic software. The COR, combined offset, acetabular orientation, and leg length discrepancy were measured on the pre- and postoperative CT scanogram at six weeks following surgery.


Bone & Joint Open
Vol. 5, Issue 4 | Pages 260 - 268
1 Apr 2024
Broekhuis D Meurs WMH Kaptein BL Karunaratne S Carey Smith RL Sommerville S Boyle R Nelissen RGHH

Aims

Custom triflange acetabular components (CTACs) play an important role in reconstructive orthopaedic surgery, particularly in revision total hip arthroplasty (rTHA) and pelvic tumour resection procedures. Accurate CTAC positioning is essential to successful surgical outcomes. While prior studies have explored CTAC positioning in rTHA, research focusing on tumour cases and implant flange positioning precision remains limited. Additionally, the impact of intraoperative navigation on positioning accuracy warrants further investigation. This study assesses CTAC positioning accuracy in tumour resection and rTHA cases, focusing on the differences between preoperative planning and postoperative implant positions.

Methods

A multicentre observational cohort study in Australia between February 2017 and March 2021 included consecutive patients undergoing acetabular reconstruction with CTACs in rTHA (Paprosky 3A/3B defects) or tumour resection (including Enneking P2 peri-acetabular area). Of 103 eligible patients (104 hips), 34 patients (35 hips) were analyzed.