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Bone & Joint Research
Vol. 13, Issue 7 | Pages 332 - 341
5 Jul 2024
Wang T Yang C Li G Wang Y Ji B Chen Y Zhou H Cao L

Aims

Although low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) combined with disinfectants has been shown to effectively eliminate portions of biofilm in vitro, its efficacy in vivo remains uncertain. Our objective was to assess the antibiofilm potential and safety of LIPUS combined with 0.35% povidone-iodine (PI) in a rat debridement, antibiotics, and implant retention (DAIR) model of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI).

Methods

A total of 56 male Sprague-Dawley rats were established in acute PJI models by intra-articular injection of bacteria. The rats were divided into four groups: a Control group, a 0.35% PI group, a LIPUS and saline group, and a LIPUS and 0.35% PI group. All rats underwent DAIR, except for Control, which underwent a sham procedure. General status, serum biochemical markers, weightbearing analysis, radiographs, micro-CT analysis, scanning electron microscopy of the prostheses, microbiological analysis, macroscope, and histopathology evaluation were performed 14 days after DAIR.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 104-B, Issue 7 | Pages 902 - 908
1 Jul 2022
Hsu P Lee C Lin S Kuo KN Wu K Wang T

Aims

The aim of this study was to compare outcomes of guided growth and varus osteotomy in treating Kalamchi type II avascular necrosis (AVN) after open reduction and Pemberton acetabuloplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH).

Methods

This retrospective study reviewed patients undergoing guided growth or varus osteotomy for Kalamchi type II AVN between September 2009 and January 2019. All children who had undergone open reduction and Pemberton acetabuloplasty for DDH with a minimum two-year follow-up were enrolled in the study. Demographic and radiological data, which included the head-shaft angle (HSA), neck-shaft angle (NSA), articulotrochanteric distance (ATD), Sharp angle (SA), and lateral centre-edge angle (LCEA) at baseline, two years, and at the extended follow-up, were compared. Revision rates were evaluated. Clinical outcomes using the Harris Hip Score were assessed two years postoperatively.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 102-B, Issue 9 | Pages 1242 - 1247
3 Sep 2020
Hsu P Wu K Lee C Lin S Kuo KN Wang T

Aims

Guided growth has been used to treat coxa valga for cerebral palsy (CP) children. However, there has been no study on the optimal position of screw application. In this paper we have investigated the influence of screw position on the outcomes of guided growth.

Methods

We retrospectively analyzed 61 hips in 32 CP children who underwent proximal femoral hemi epiphysiodesis between July 2012 and September 2017. The hips were divided into two groups according to the transphyseal position of the screw in the coronal plane: across medial quarter (Group 1) or middle quarter (Group 2) of the medial half of the physis. We compared pre- and postoperative radiographs in head-shaft angle (HSA), Reimer’s migration percentage (MP), acetabular index (AI), and femoral anteversion angle (FAVA), as well as incidences of the physis growing-off the screw within two years. Linear and Cox regression analysis were conducted to identify factors related to HSA correction and risk of the physis growing-off the screw.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 98-B, Issue 8 | Pages 1145 - 1150
1 Aug 2016
Wang C Wang T Wu K Huang S Kuo KN

Aims

This study compared the long-term results following Salter osteotomy and Pemberton acetabuloplasty in children with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We assessed if there was a greater increase in pelvic height following the Salter osteotomy, and if this had a continued effect on pelvic tilt, lumbar curvature or functional outcomes.

Patients and Methods

We reviewed 42 children at more than ten years post-operatively following a unilateral Salter osteotomy or Pemberton acetabuloplasty. We measured the increase in pelvic height and the iliac crest tilt and sacral tilt at the most recent review and at an earlier review point in the first decade of follow-up. We measured the lumbar Cobb angle and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) and Harris hip scores were collected at the most recent review.


The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery British Volume
Vol. 94-B, Issue 2 | Pages 227 - 230
1 Feb 2012
Yang T Wang T Tsai Y Huang K

In patients with traumatic brain injury and fractures of long bones, it is often clinically observed that the rate of bone healing and extent of callus formation are increased. However, the evidence has been unconvincing and an association between such an injury and enhanced fracture healing remains unclear. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 74 young adult patients with a mean age of 24.2 years (16 to 40) who sustained a femoral shaft fracture (AO/OTA type 32A or 32B) with or without a brain injury. All the fractures were treated with closed intramedullary nailing. The main outcome measures included the time required for bridging callus formation (BCF) and the mean callus thickness (MCT) at the final follow-up. Comparative analyses were made between the 20 patients with a brain injury and the 54 without brain injury. Subgroup comparisons were performed among the patients with a brain injury in terms of the severity of head injury, the types of intracranial haemorrhage and gender. Patients with a brain injury had an earlier appearance of BCF (p < 0.001) and a greater final MCT value (p < 0.001) than those without. There were no significant differences with respect to the time required for BCF and final MCT values in terms of the severity of head injury (p = 0.521 and p = 0.153, respectively), the types of intracranial haemorrhage (p = 0.308 and p = 0.189, respectively) and gender (p = 0.383 and p = 0.662, respectively).

These results confirm that an injury to the brain may be associated with accelerated fracture healing and enhanced callus formation. However, the severity of the injury to the brain, the type of intracranial haemorrhage and gender were not statistically significant factors in predicting the rate of bone healing and extent of final callus formation.