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Volume 4, Issue 11 November 2023

Panagiotis Filis Dimitrios Varvarousis Georgios Ntritsos Dimitrios Dimopoulos Nikolaos Filis Nikolaos Giannakeas Anastasios Korompilias Avraam Ploumis

Aims

The standard of surgical treatment for lower limb neoplasms had been characterized by highly interventional techniques, leading to severe kinetic impairment of the patients and incidences of phantom pain. Rotationplasty had arisen as a potent limb salvage treatment option for young cancer patients with lower limb bone tumours, but its impact on the gait through comparative studies still remains unclear several years after the introduction of the procedure. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of rotationplasty on gait parameters measured by gait analysis compared to healthy individuals.

Methods

The MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane databases were systematically searched without time restriction until 10 January 2022 for eligible studies. Gait parameters measured by gait analysis were the outcomes of interest.


Prince J. S. Joseph Mohammed Khattak Sundas T. Masudi Louise Minta Daniel C. Perry

Aims

Hip disease is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and can decrease quality of life and function. Surveillance programmes exist to improve outcomes by treating hip disease at an early stage using radiological surveillance. However, studies and surveillance programmes report different radiological outcomes, making it difficult to compare. We aimed to identify the most important radiological measurements and develop a core measurement set (CMS) for clinical practice, research, and surveillance programmes.

Methods

A systematic review identified a list of measurements previously used in studies reporting radiological hip outcomes in children with CP. These measurements informed a two-round Delphi study, conducted among orthopaedic surgeons and specialist physiotherapists. Participants rated each measurement on a nine-point Likert scale (‘not important’ to ‘critically important’). A consensus meeting was held to finalize the CMS.


Lorenz Pichler Zhao Li Thilo Khakzad Carsten Perka Matthias Pumberger Friederike Schömig

Aims

Implant-related postoperative spondylodiscitis (IPOS) is a severe complication in spine surgery and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. With growing knowledge in the field of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI), equivalent investigations towards the management of implant-related infections of the spine are indispensable. To our knowledge, this study provides the largest description of cases of IPOS to date.

Methods

Patients treated for IPOS from January 2006 to December 2020 were included. Patient demographics, parameters upon admission and discharge, radiological imaging, and microbiological results were retrieved from medical records. CT and MRI were analyzed for epidural, paravertebral, and intervertebral abscess formation, vertebral destruction, and endplate involvement. Pathogens were identified by CT-guided or intraoperative biopsy, intraoperative tissue sampling, or implant sonication.


Stuart A. Callary Deepti K. Sharma Taisha M. D’Apollonio David G. Campbell

Aims

Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) is the most accurate radiological method to measure in vivo wear of highly cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) acetabular components. We have previously reported very low wear rates for a sequentially irradiated and annealed X3 XLPE liner (Stryker Orthopaedics, USA) when used in conjunction with a 32 mm femoral heads at ten-year follow-up. Only two studies have reported the long-term wear rate of X3 liners used in conjunction with larger heads using plain radiographs which have poor sensitivity. The aim of this study was to measure the ten-year wear of thin X3 XLPE liners against larger 36 or 40 mm articulations with RSA.

Methods

We prospectively reviewed 19 patients who underwent primary cementless THA with the XLPE acetabular liner (X3) and a 36 or 40 mm femoral head with a resultant liner thickness of at least 5.8 mm. RSA radiographs at one week, six months, and one, two, five, and ten years postoperatively and femoral head penetration within the acetabular component were measured with UmRSA software. Of the initial 19 patients, 12 were available at the ten-year time point.


Raymond G. Kim Anthony W. Maher Sascha Karunaratne Paul D. Stalley Richard A. Boyle

Aims

Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (TGCT) is a rare benign tumour of the musculoskeletal system. Surgical management is fraught with challenges due to high recurrence rates. The aim of this study was to describe surgical treatment and evaluate surgical outcomes of TGCT at an Australian tertiary referral centre for musculoskeletal tumours and to identify factors affecting recurrence rates.

Methods

A prospective database of all patients with TGCT surgically managed by two orthopaedic oncology surgeons was reviewed. All cases irrespective of previous treatment were included and patients without follow-up were excluded. Pertinent tumour characteristics and surgical outcomes were collected for analysis.


Hariharan Subbiah Ponniah Kartik Logishetty Thomas C. Edwards Gian C. Singer

Aims

Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MoM-HR) has seen decreased usage due to safety and longevity concerns. Joint registries have highlighted the risks in females, smaller hips, and hip dysplasia. This study aimed to identify if reported risk factors are linked to revision in a long-term follow-up of MoM-HR performed by a non-designer surgeon.

Methods

A retrospective review of consecutive MoM hip arthroplasties (MoM-HRAs) using Birmingham Hip Resurfacing was conducted. Data on procedure side, indication, implant sizes and orientation, highest blood cobalt and chromium ion concentrations, and all-cause revision were collected from local and UK National Joint Registry records.


Hongtai Chen Vincent W. K. Chan Chun H. Yan Henry Fu Ping-Keung Chan KwongYuen Chiu

Aims

The surgical helmet system (SHS) was developed to reduce the risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI), but the evidence is contradictory, with some studies suggesting an increased risk of PJI due to potential leakage through the glove-gown interface (GGI) caused by its positive pressure. We assumed that SHS and glove exchange had an impact on the leakage via GGI.

Methods

There were 404 arthroplasty simulations with fluorescent gel, in which SHS was used (H+) or not (H-), and GGI was sealed (S+) or not (S-), divided into four groups: H+S+, H+S-, H-S+, and H-S-, varying by exposure duration (15 to 60 minutes) and frequency of glove exchanges (0 to 6 times). The intensity of fluorescent leakage through GGI was quantified automatically with an image analysis software. The effect of the above factors on fluorescent leakage via GGI were compared and analyzed.


Children's Orthopaedics
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Sabba A. Hussain Aisling Russell Sean E. Cavanagh Anna Bridgens Yael Gelfer

Aims

The Ponseti method is the gold standard treatment for congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV), with the British Consensus Statement providing a benchmark for standard of care. Meeting these standards and providing expert care while maintaining geographical accessibility can pose a service delivery challenge. A novel ‘Hub and Spoke’ Shared Care model was initiated to deliver Ponseti treatment for CTEV, while addressing standard of care and resource allocation. The aim of this study was to assess feasibility and outcomes of the corrective phase of Ponseti service delivery using this model.

Methods

Patients with idiopathic CTEV were seen in their local hospitals (‘Spokes’) for initial diagnosis and casting, followed by referral to the tertiary hospital (‘Hub’) for tenotomy. Non-idiopathic CTEV was managed solely by the Hub. Primary and secondary outcomes were achieving primary correction, and complication rates resulting in early transfer to the Hub, respectively. Consecutive data were prospectively collected and compared between patients allocated to Hub or Spokes. Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, or chi-squared tests were used for analysis (alpha-priori = 0.05, two-tailed significance).


Lizzie Swaby Daniel C. Perry Kerry Walker Daniel Hind Andrew Mills Raveen Jayasuriya Nikki Totton Lauren Desoysa Robin Chatters Bridget Young Frances Sherratt Nick Latimer Anju Keetharuth Laura Kenison Stephen Walters Adrian Gardner Sashin Ahuja Laura Campbell Sarah Greenwood Ashley Cole

Aims

Scoliosis is a lateral curvature of the spine with associated rotation, often causing distress due to appearance. For some curves, there is good evidence to support the use of a spinal brace, worn for 20 to 24 hours a day to minimize the curve, making it as straight as possible during growth, preventing progression. Compliance can be poor due to appearance and comfort. A night-time brace, worn for eight to 12 hours, can achieve higher levels of curve correction while patients are supine, and could be preferable for patients, but evidence of efficacy is limited. This is the protocol for a randomized controlled trial of ‘full-time bracing’ versus ‘night-time bracing’ in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS).

Methods

UK paediatric spine clinics will recruit 780 participants aged ten to 15 years-old with AIS, Risser stage 0, 1, or 2, and curve size (Cobb angle) 20° to 40° with apex at or below T7. Patients are randomly allocated 1:1, to either full-time or night-time bracing. A qualitative sub-study will explore communication and experiences of families in terms of bracing and research. Patient and Public Involvement & Engagement informed study design and will assist with aspects of trial delivery and dissemination.


Knee
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Steven Denyer Carlo Eikani Monica Sheth Daniel Schmitt Nicholas Brown

Aims

The diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be challenging as the symptoms are similar to other conditions, and the markers used for diagnosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Recent research has suggested using blood cell ratios, such as platelet-to-volume ratio (PVR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), to improve diagnostic accuracy. The aim of the study was to further validate the effectiveness of PVR and PLR in diagnosing PJI.

Methods

A retrospective review was conducted to assess the accuracy of different marker combinations for diagnosing chronic PJI. A total of 573 patients were included in the study, of which 124 knees and 122 hips had a diagnosis of chronic PJI. Complete blood count and synovial fluid analysis were collected. Recently published blood cell ratio cut-off points were applied to receiver operating characteristic curves for all markers and combinations. The area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated.


Nick. D. Clement Ewen Fraser Alisdair Gilmour James Doonan Angus MacLean Bryn G. Jones Mark J. G. Blyth

Aims

To perform an incremental cost-utility analysis and assess the impact of differential costs and case volume on the cost-effectiveness of robotic arm-assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (rUKA) compared to manual (mUKA).

Methods

This was a five-year follow-up study of patients who were randomized to rUKA (n = 64) or mUKA (n = 65). Patients completed the EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) preoperatively, and at three months and one, two, and five years postoperatively, which was used to calculate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. Costs for the primary and additional surgery and healthcare costs were calculated.


Georgios Orfanos Nakulan Nantha Kumar Daniel Redfern Ben Burston Robin Banerjee Geraint Thomas

Aims

We aim to evaluate the usefulness of postoperative blood tests by investigating the incidence of abnormal results following total joint replacement (TJR), as well as identifying preoperative risk factors for abnormal blood test results postoperatively, especially pertaining to anaemia and acute kidney injury (AKI).

Methods

This is a retrospective cohort study of patients who had elective TJR between January and December 2019 at a tertiary centre. Data gathered included age at time of surgery, sex, BMI, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, preoperative and postoperative laboratory test results, haemoglobin (Hgb), white blood count (WBC), haematocrit (Hct), platelets (Plts), sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), creatinine (Cr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and Ferritin (ug/l). Abnormal blood tests, AKI, electrolyte imbalance, anaemia, transfusion, reoperation, and readmission within one year were reported.