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The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 104-B, Issue 7 | Pages 833 - 843
1 Jul 2022
Kayani B Baawa-Ameyaw J Fontalis A Tahmassebi J Wardle N Middleton R Stephen A Hutchinson J Haddad FS

Aims

This study reports the ten-year wear rates, incidence of osteolysis, clinical outcomes, and complications of a multicentre randomized controlled trial comparing oxidized zirconium (OxZr) versus cobalt-chrome (CoCr) femoral heads with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and highly cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) liners in total hip arthroplasty (THA).

Methods

Patients undergoing primary THA were recruited from four institutions and prospectively allocated to the following treatment groups: Group A, CoCr femoral head with XLPE liner; Group B, OxZr femoral head with XLPE liner; and Group C, OxZr femoral head with UHMWPE liner. All study patients and assessors recording outcomes were blinded to the treatment groups. The outcomes of 262 study patients were analyzed at ten years’ follow-up.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 103-B, Issue 1 | Pages 113 - 122
1 Jan 2021
Kayani B Tahmassebi J Ayuob A Konan S Oussedik S Haddad FS

Aims

The primary aim of this study was to compare the postoperative systemic inflammatory response in conventional jig-based total knee arthroplasty (conventional TKA) versus robotic-arm assisted total knee arthroplasty (robotic TKA). Secondary aims were to compare the macroscopic soft tissue injury, femoral and tibial bone trauma, localized thermal response, and the accuracy of component positioning between the two treatment groups.

Methods

This prospective randomized controlled trial included 30 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee undergoing conventional TKA versus robotic TKA. Predefined serum markers of inflammation and localized knee temperature were collected preoperatively and postoperatively at six hours, day 1, day 2, day 7, and day 28 following TKA. Blinded observers used the Macroscopic Soft Tissue Injury (MASTI) classification system to grade intraoperative periarticular soft tissue injury and bone trauma. Plain radiographs were used to assess the accuracy of achieving the planned postioning of the components in both groups.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 101-B, Issue 1 | Pages 24 - 33
1 Jan 2019
Kayani B Konan S Tahmassebi J Rowan FE Haddad FS

Aims

The objectives of this study were to compare postoperative pain, analgesia requirements, inpatient functional rehabilitation, time to hospital discharge, and complications in patients undergoing conventional jig-based unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) versus robotic-arm assisted UKA.

Patients and Methods

This prospective cohort study included 146 patients with symptomatic medial compartment knee osteoarthritis undergoing primary UKA performed by a single surgeon. This included 73 consecutive patients undergoing conventional jig-based mobile bearing UKA, followed by 73 consecutive patients receiving robotic-arm assisted fixed bearing UKA. All surgical procedures were performed using the standard medial parapatellar approach for UKA, and all patients underwent the same postoperative rehabilitation programme. Postoperative pain scores on the numerical rating scale and opiate analgesia consumption were recorded until discharge. Time to attainment of predefined functional rehabilitation outcomes, hospital discharge, and postoperative complications were recorded by independent observers.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 101-B, Issue 1 | Pages 22 - 23
1 Jan 2019
Kayani B Konan S Tahmassebi J Rowan FE Haddad FS


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 100-B, Issue 8 | Pages 1033 - 1042
1 Aug 2018
Kayani B Konan S Pietrzak JRT Huq SS Tahmassebi J Haddad FS

Aims

The primary aim of this study was to determine the surgical team’s learning curve for introducing robotic-arm assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) into routine surgical practice. The secondary objective was to compare accuracy of implant positioning in conventional jig-based UKA versus robotic-arm assisted UKA.

Patients and Methods

This prospective single-surgeon cohort study included 60 consecutive conventional jig-based UKAs compared with 60 consecutive robotic-arm assisted UKAs for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Patients undergoing conventional UKA and robotic-arm assisted UKA were well-matched for baseline characteristics including a mean age of 65.5 years (sd 6.8) vs 64.1 years (sd 8.7), (p = 0.31); a mean body mass index of 27.2 kg.m2 (sd 2.7) vs 28.1 kg.m2 (sd 4.5), (p = 0.25); and gender (27 males: 33 females vs 26 males: 34 females, p = 0.85). Surrogate measures of the learning curve were prospectively collected. These included operative times, the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire to assess preoperative stress levels amongst the surgical team, accuracy of implant positioning, limb alignment, and postoperative complications.


Aims

The objective of this study was to compare early postoperative functional outcomes and time to hospital discharge between conventional jig-based total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and robotic-arm assisted TKA.

Patients and Methods

This prospective cohort study included 40 consecutive patients undergoing conventional jig-based TKA followed by 40 consecutive patients receiving robotic-arm assisted TKA. All surgical procedures were performed by a single surgeon using the medial parapatellar approach with identical implant designs and standardized postoperative inpatient rehabilitation. Inpatient functional outcomes and time to hospital discharge were collected in all study patients.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 100-B, Issue 1_Supple_A | Pages 76 - 82
1 Jan 2018
Benjamin B Pietrzak JRT Tahmassebi J Haddad FS

Aims

The outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is not always satisfactory. The purpose of this study was to identify satisfaction and biomechanical features characterising the gait of patients who had undergone TKA with either an anatomical single radius design or a medial pivot design. We hypothesised that the latter would provide superior function.

Patients and Methods

This is a study of a subset of patients recruited into a prospective randomised study of a single radius design versus a medial pivot design, with a minimum follow-up of one year. Outcome measurements included clinical scores (Knee Society Score (KSS) and Oxford Knee Score (OKS)) and gait analysis using an instrumented treadmill.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 97-B, Issue 7 | Pages 883 - 889
1 Jul 2015
Jassim SS Patel S Wardle N Tahmassebi J Middleton R Shardlow DL Stephen A Hutchinson J Haddad FS

Oxidised zirconium (OxZi) has been developed as an alternative bearing surface for femoral heads in total hip arthroplasty (THA). This study has investigated polyethylene wear, functional outcomes and complications, comparing OxZi and cobalt–chrome (CoCr) as part of a three-arm, multicentre randomised controlled trial. Patients undergoing THA from four institutions were prospectively randomised into three groups. Group A received a CoCr femoral head and highly cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) liner; Group B received an OxZi femoral head and XLPE liner; Group C received an OxZi femoral head and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) liner. At five years, 368 patients had no statistically significant differences in short-form-36 (p = 0.176 mental, p = 0.756 physical), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (p = 0.847), pain scores (p = 0.458) or complications. The mean rate of linear wear was 0.028 mm/year (standard deviation (sd) 0.010) for Group A, 0.023 mm/year (sd 0.010) for Group B, and 0.09 mm/year (sd 0.045) for Group C. Penetration was significantly higher in the UHMWPE liner group compared with both XLPE liner groups (p < 0.001) but no significant difference was noted between CoCr and OxZi when articulating with XLPE (p = 0.153). In this, the largest randomised study of this bearing surface, it appears that using a XLPE acetabular liner is more important in reducing THA component wear than the choice of femoral head bearing, at mid-term follow-up. There is a non-significant trend towards lower wear, coupling OxZi rather than CoCr with XLPE but long-term analysis is required to see if this observation changes with time and becomes significant.

Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:883–9.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 97-B, Issue 5 | Pages 617 - 622
1 May 2015
Haddad FS Konan S Tahmassebi J

The aim of this study was to evaluate the ten-year clinical and functional outcome of hip resurfacing and to compare it with that of cementless hip arthroplasty in patients under the age of 55 years.

Between 1999 and 2002, 80 patients were enrolled into the study: 24 were randomised (11 to hip resurfacing, 13 to total hip arthroplasty), 18 refused hip resurfacing and chose cementless total hip arthroplasty with a 32 mm bearing, and 38 insisted on resurfacing. The mean follow-up for all patients was 12.1 years (10 to 14).

Patients were assessed clinically and radiologically at one year, five years and ten years. Outcome measures included EuroQol EQ5D, Oxford, Harris hip, University of California Los Angeles and University College Hospital functional scores.

No differences were seen between the two groups in the Oxford or Harris hip scores or in the quality of life scores. Despite a similar aspiration to activity pre-operatively, a higher proportion of patients with a hip resurfacing were running and involved in sport and heavy manual labour after ten years.

We found significantly higher function scores in patients who had undergone hip resurfacing than in those with a cementless hip arthroplasty at ten years. This suggests a functional advantage for hip resurfacing. There were no other attendant problems.

Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015; 97-B:617–22.