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Bone & Joint Open
Vol. 2, Issue 2 | Pages 93 - 102
1 Feb 2021
Thompson JW Wignadasan W Ibrahim M Beasley L Konan S Plastow R Magan A Haddad FS

Aims

We present the development of a day-case total hip arthroplasty (THA) pathway in a UK National Health Service institution in conjunction with an extensive evidence-based summary of the interventions used to achieve successful day-case THA to which the protocol is founded upon.

Methods

We performed a prospective audit of day-case THA in our institution as we reinitiate our full capacity elective services. In parallel, we performed a review of the literature reporting complication or readmission rates at ≥ 30-day postoperative following day-case THA. Electronic searches were performed using four databases from the date of inception to November 2020. Relevant studies were identified, data extracted, and qualitative synthesis performed.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 103-B, Issue 1 | Pages 113 - 122
1 Jan 2021
Kayani B Tahmassebi J Ayuob A Konan S Oussedik S Haddad FS

Aims

The primary aim of this study was to compare the postoperative systemic inflammatory response in conventional jig-based total knee arthroplasty (conventional TKA) versus robotic-arm assisted total knee arthroplasty (robotic TKA). Secondary aims were to compare the macroscopic soft tissue injury, femoral and tibial bone trauma, localized thermal response, and the accuracy of component positioning between the two treatment groups.

Methods

This prospective randomized controlled trial included 30 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee undergoing conventional TKA versus robotic TKA. Predefined serum markers of inflammation and localized knee temperature were collected preoperatively and postoperatively at six hours, day 1, day 2, day 7, and day 28 following TKA. Blinded observers used the Macroscopic Soft Tissue Injury (MASTI) classification system to grade intraoperative periarticular soft tissue injury and bone trauma. Plain radiographs were used to assess the accuracy of achieving the planned postioning of the components in both groups.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 102-B, Issue 4 | Pages 442 - 448
1 Apr 2020
Kayani B Konan S Ahmed SS Chang JS Ayuob A Haddad FS

Aims

The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) resection on flexion-extension gaps, mediolateral soft tissue laxity, maximum knee extension, and limb alignment during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Methods

This prospective study included 140 patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis undergoing primary robotic-arm assisted TKA. All operative procedures were performed by a single surgeon using a standard medial parapatellar approach. Optical motion capture technology with fixed femoral and tibial registration pins was used to assess study outcomes pre- and post-ACL resection with knee extension and 90° knee flexion. This study included 76 males (54.3%) and 64 females (45.7%) with a mean age of 64.1 years (SD 6.8) at time of surgery. Mean preoperative hip-knee-ankle deformity was 6.1° varus (SD 4.6° varus).


Bone & Joint Research
Vol. 8, Issue 12 | Pages 604 - 607
1 Dec 2019
Konan S Abdel MP Haddad FS

There is continued debate as to whether cemented or cementless implants should be utilized in particular cases based upon chronological age. This debate has been rekindled in the UK and other countries by directives mandating certain forms of acetabular and femoral component fixation based exclusively on the chronological age of the patient. This editorial focuses on the literature-based arguments to support the use of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA), while addressing potential concerns surrounding safety and cost-effectiveness.

Cite this article: Bone Joint Res. 2019;8(12):604–607.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 101-B, Issue 10 | Pages 1230 - 1237
1 Oct 2019
Kayani B Konan S Horriat S Ibrahim MS Haddad FS

Aims

The aim of this study was to assess the effect of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) resection on flexion-extension gaps, mediolateral soft-tissue laxity, fixed flexion deformity (FFD), and limb alignment during posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Patients and Methods

This prospective study included 110 patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee undergoing primary robot-assisted PS TKA. All operations were performed by a single surgeon using a standard medial parapatellar approach. Optical motion capture technology with fixed femoral and tibial registration pins was used to assess gaps before and after PCL resection in extension and 90° knee flexion. Measurements were made after excision of the anterior cruciate ligament and prior to bone resection. There were 54 men (49.1%) and 56 women (50.9%) with a mean age of 68 years (sd 6.2) at the time of surgery. The mean preoperative hip-knee-ankle deformity was 4.1° varus (sd 3.4).


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 101-B, Issue 8 | Pages 897 - 901
1 Aug 2019
Konan S Alazzawi S Yoon B Cha Y Koo K

Ceramic bearings have several desirable properties, such as resistance to wear, hardness, and biocompatibility, that favour it as an articulating surface in hip arthroplasty. However, ceramic fracture remains a concern. We have reviewed the contemporary literature, addressing the factors that can influence the incidence of ceramic bearing surface fracture.

Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2019;101-B:897–901.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 101-B, Issue 1 | Pages 24 - 33
1 Jan 2019
Kayani B Konan S Tahmassebi J Rowan FE Haddad FS

Aims

The objectives of this study were to compare postoperative pain, analgesia requirements, inpatient functional rehabilitation, time to hospital discharge, and complications in patients undergoing conventional jig-based unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) versus robotic-arm assisted UKA.

Patients and Methods

This prospective cohort study included 146 patients with symptomatic medial compartment knee osteoarthritis undergoing primary UKA performed by a single surgeon. This included 73 consecutive patients undergoing conventional jig-based mobile bearing UKA, followed by 73 consecutive patients receiving robotic-arm assisted fixed bearing UKA. All surgical procedures were performed using the standard medial parapatellar approach for UKA, and all patients underwent the same postoperative rehabilitation programme. Postoperative pain scores on the numerical rating scale and opiate analgesia consumption were recorded until discharge. Time to attainment of predefined functional rehabilitation outcomes, hospital discharge, and postoperative complications were recorded by independent observers.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 101-B, Issue 1_Supple_A | Pages 11 - 18
1 Jan 2019
Kayani B Konan S Thakrar RR Huq SS Haddad FS

Objectives

The primary objective of this study was to compare accuracy in restoring the native centre of hip rotation in patients undergoing conventional manual total hip arthroplasty (THA) versus robotic-arm assisted THA. Secondary objectives were to determine differences between these treatment techniques for THA in achieving the planned combined offset, component inclination, component version, and leg-length correction.

Materials and Methods

This prospective cohort study included 50 patients undergoing conventional manual THA and 25 patients receiving robotic-arm assisted THA. Patients undergoing conventional manual THA and robotic-arm assisted THA were well matched for age (mean age, 69.4 years (sd 5.2) vs 67.5 years (sd 5.8) (p = 0.25); body mass index (27.4 kg/m2 (sd 2.1) vs 26.9 kg/m2 (sd 2.2); p = 0.39); and laterality of surgery (right = 28, left = 22 vs right = 12, left = 13; p = 0.78). All operative procedures were undertaken by a single surgeon using the posterior approach. Two independent blinded observers recorded all radiological outcomes of interest using plain radiographs.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 101-B, Issue 1 | Pages 22 - 23
1 Jan 2019
Kayani B Konan S Tahmassebi J Rowan FE Haddad FS


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 100-B, Issue 11 | Pages 1405 - 1406
1 Nov 2018
Haddad FS Oussedik S Meek RMD Konan S Stockley I Gant V


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 100-B, Issue 8 | Pages 1033 - 1042
1 Aug 2018
Kayani B Konan S Pietrzak JRT Huq SS Tahmassebi J Haddad FS

Aims

The primary aim of this study was to determine the surgical team’s learning curve for introducing robotic-arm assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) into routine surgical practice. The secondary objective was to compare accuracy of implant positioning in conventional jig-based UKA versus robotic-arm assisted UKA.

Patients and Methods

This prospective single-surgeon cohort study included 60 consecutive conventional jig-based UKAs compared with 60 consecutive robotic-arm assisted UKAs for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Patients undergoing conventional UKA and robotic-arm assisted UKA were well-matched for baseline characteristics including a mean age of 65.5 years (sd 6.8) vs 64.1 years (sd 8.7), (p = 0.31); a mean body mass index of 27.2 kg.m2 (sd 2.7) vs 28.1 kg.m2 (sd 4.5), (p = 0.25); and gender (27 males: 33 females vs 26 males: 34 females, p = 0.85). Surrogate measures of the learning curve were prospectively collected. These included operative times, the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire to assess preoperative stress levels amongst the surgical team, accuracy of implant positioning, limb alignment, and postoperative complications.


Aims

The objective of this study was to compare early postoperative functional outcomes and time to hospital discharge between conventional jig-based total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and robotic-arm assisted TKA.

Patients and Methods

This prospective cohort study included 40 consecutive patients undergoing conventional jig-based TKA followed by 40 consecutive patients receiving robotic-arm assisted TKA. All surgical procedures were performed by a single surgeon using the medial parapatellar approach with identical implant designs and standardized postoperative inpatient rehabilitation. Inpatient functional outcomes and time to hospital discharge were collected in all study patients.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 100-B, Issue 1_Supple_A | Pages 17 - 21
1 Jan 2018
Konan S Duncan CP

Patients with neuromuscular imbalance who require total hip arthroplasty (THA) present particular technical problems due to altered anatomy, abnormal bone stock, muscular imbalance and problems of rehabilitation.

In this systematic review, we studied articles dealing with THA in patients with neuromuscular imbalance, published before April 2017. We recorded the demographics of the patients and the type of neuromuscular pathology, the indication for surgery, surgical approach, concomitant soft-tissue releases, the type of implant and bearing, pain and functional outcome as well as complications and survival.

Recent advances in THA technology allow for successful outcomes in these patients. Our review suggests excellent benefits for pain relief and good functional outcome might be expected with a modest risk of complication.

Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B(1 Supple A):17–21.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 99-B, Issue 6 | Pages 732 - 740
1 Jun 2017
Meermans G Konan S Das R Volpin A Haddad FS

Aims

The most effective surgical approach for total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains controversial. The direct anterior approach may be associated with a reduced risk of dislocation, faster recovery, reduced pain and fewer surgical complications. This systematic review aims to evaluate the current evidence for the use of this approach in THA.

Materials and Methods

Following the Cochrane collaboration, an extensive literature search of PubMed, Medline, Embase and OvidSP was conducted. Randomised controlled trials, comparative studies, and cohort studies were included. Outcomes included the length of the incision, blood loss, operating time, length of stay, complications, and gait analysis.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 99-B, Issue 4_Supple_B | Pages 49 - 55
1 Apr 2017
Hossain F Konan S Volpin A Haddad FS

Aims

The aim of this study was to compare early functional and health related quality of life outcomes (HRQoL) in patients who have undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA) using a bone conserving short stem femoral component and those in whom a conventional length uncemented component was used. Outcome was assessed using a validated performance based outcome instrument as well as patient reported outcome measures (PROMs).

Patients and Methods

We prospectively analysed 33 patients whose THA involved a contemporary proximally porous coated tapered short stem femoral component and 53 patients with a standard conventional femoral component, at a minimum follow-up of two years. The mean follow-up was 31.4 months (24 to 39). Patients with poor proximal femoral bone quality were excluded. The mean age of the patients was 66.6 years (59 to 77) and the mean body mass index was 30.2 kg/m2 (24.1 to 41.0). Outcome was assessed using the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and the University College Hospital (UCH) hip score which is a validated performance based instrument. HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D).


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 98-B, Issue 11 | Pages 1489 - 1496
1 Nov 2016
Konan S Sandiford N Unno F Masri BS Garbuz DS Duncan CP

Fractures around total knee arthroplasties pose a significant surgical challenge. Most can be managed with osteosynthesis and salvage of the replacement. The techniques of fixation of these fractures and revision surgery have evolved and so has the assessment of outcome. This specialty update summarises the current evidence for the classification, methods of fixation, revision surgery and outcomes of the management of periprosthetic fractures associated with total knee arthroplasty.

Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1489–96.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 98-B, Issue 10_Supple_B | Pages 11 - 15
1 Oct 2016
Konan S Haddad FS

Aims

Medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is associated with successful outcomes in carefully selected patient cohorts. We hypothesised that severity and location of patellofemoral cartilage lesions significantly influences functional outcome after Oxford medial compartmental knee arthroplasty.

Patients and Methods

We reviewed 100 consecutive UKAs at minimum eight-year follow-up (96 to 132). A single surgeon performed all procedures. Patients were selected based on clinical and plain radiographic assessment. All patients had end-stage medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA) with sparing of the lateral compartment and intact anterior cruciate ligaments. None of the patients had end-stage patellofemoral OA, but patients with anterior knee pain or partial thickness chondral loss were not excluded. There were 57 male and 43 female patients. The mean age at surgery was 69 years (41 to 82). At surgery the joint was carefully inspected for patellofemoral chondral loss and this was documented based on severity of cartilage loss (0 to 4 Outerbridge grading) and topographic location (medial, lateral, central, and superior or inferior). Functional scores collected included Oxford Knee Score (OKS), patient satisfaction scale and University College Hospital (UCH) knee score. Intraclass correlation was used to compare chondral damage to outcomes.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 98-B, Issue 6 | Pages 767 - 771
1 Jun 2016
Konan S Duncan CP Masri BA Garbuz DS

Aims

Reconstruction of the acetabulum after failed total hip arthroplasty (THA) can be a surgical challenge in the presence of severe bone loss. We report the long-term survival of a porous tantalum revision acetabular component, its radiological appearance and quality of life outcomes.

Patients and Methods

We reviewed the results of 46 patients who had undergone revision of a failed acetabular component with a Paprosky II or III bone defect and reconstruction with a hemispherical, tantalum acetabular component, supplementary screws and a cemented polyethylene liner.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 98-B, Issue 1_Supple_A | Pages 50 - 53
1 Jan 2016
Konan S Garbuz DS Masri BA Duncan CP

Tapered fluted titanium stems are increasingly used for femoral revision arthroplasty. They are available in modular and non-modular forms. Modularity has advantages when the bone loss is severe, the proximal femur is mis shapen or the surgeon is unfamiliar with the implant, but it introduces the risk of fracture of the stem at the junction between it and the proximal body segment. For that reason, and while awaiting intermediate-term results of more recently introduced designs of this junction, non-modularity has attracted attention, at least for straightforward revision cases.

We review the risks and causes of fracture of tapered titanium modular revision stems and present an argument in favour of the more selective use of modular designs.

Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(1 Suppl A):50–3.


The Bone & Joint Journal
Vol. 98-B, Issue 1_Supple_A | Pages 27 - 30
1 Jan 2016
Whitehouse MR Parry MC Konan S Duncan CP

Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) complicates between 0.5% and 1.2% primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) and may have devastating consequences. The traditional assessment of patients suffering from PJI has involved the serological study of inflammatory markers and microbiological analysis of samples obtained from the joint space. Treatment has involved debridement and revision arthroplasty performed in either one or two stages.

We present an update on the burden of PJI, strategies for its diagnosis and treatment, the challenge of resistant organisms and the need for definitive evidence to guide the treatment of PJI after THA.

Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(1 Suppl A):27–30.